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Eugénia Pinto   Professor  University Lecturer 
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Eugénia Pinto published an article in October 2018.
Top co-authors See all
Madalena Pinto

205 shared publications

Laboratory of Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Department of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal

Lígia Ribeiro Salgueiro

89 shared publications

Facultade de Farmácia/CEF, Universidade de Coimbra, Azinhaga de Santa Comba , 3000 Coimbra , Portugal

Emília Sousa

72 shared publications

Laboratory of Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Maria Angelica Barros

20 shared publications

State University of Maringá, Maringá, Brazil

Ângela S. Inácio

3 shared publications

Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR), Terminal de Cruzeiros do Porto de Leixões, Av. General Norton de Matos s/n, 4450-208 Matosinhos, Portugal

64
Publications
43
Reads
18
Downloads
503
Citations
Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2001 - 2018)
Total number of journals
published in
 
30
 
Publications See all
Article 1 Read 0 Citations Lichen Xanthones as Models for New Antifungal Agents Diana I. S. P. Resende, Patrícia Pereira-Terra, Ângela S. In... Published: 12 October 2018
Molecules, doi: 10.3390/molecules23102617
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogenic microorganisms, the search for new antimicrobial compounds plays an important role in current medicinal chemistry research. Inspired by lichen antimicrobial xanthones, a series of novel chlorinated xanthones was prepared using five chlorination methods (Methods A–E) to obtain different patterns of substitution in the xanthone scaffold. All the synthesized compounds were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity. Among them, 3-chloro-4,6-dimethoxy-1-methyl-9H-xanthen-9-one 15 showed promising antibacterial activity against E. faecalis (ATCC 29212 and 29213) and S. aureus ATCC 29213. 2,7-Dichloro-3,4,6-trimethoxy-1-methyl-9H-xanthen-9-one 18 revealed a potent fungistatic and fungicidal activity against dermatophytes clinical strains (T. rubrum, M. canis, and E. floccosum (MIC = 4–8 µg/mL)). Moreover, when evaluated for its synergistic effect for T. rubrum, compound 18 exhibited synergy with fluconazole (ΣFIC = 0.289). These results disclosed new hit xanthones for both antibacterial and antifungal activity.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Cleaner production of antimicrobial and anti-UV cotton materials through dyeing with eucalyptus leaves extract Márcia Gomes Da Silva, Maria Angélica S. D. De Barros, Rafae... Published: 01 October 2018
Journal of Cleaner Production, doi: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.07.221
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Aspergillus Species and Antifungals Susceptibility in Clinical Setting in the North of Portugal: Cryptic Species and Eme... Eugénia Pinto, Carolina Monteiro, Marta Maia, Miguel A. Fari... Published: 23 July 2018
Frontiers in Microbiology, doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2018.01656
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Aspergillus spp. are agents of a broad-spectrum of diseases among humans. Their growing resistance to azoles, the cornerstone in the management of human aspergillosis, is a worrisome problem around the world. Considering lack of data from Portugal on this topic, particularly from the northern region, a retrospective surveillance study was planned to assess frequency of cryptic Aspergillus species and azoles resistance. A total of 227 clinical isolates, mainly from the respiratory tract (92.1%), collected from three hospitals serving a population of about three million people, were studied for their epidemiology and antifungal susceptibility patterns determined by the E.DEF.9.3 protocol of EUCAST. Employing molecular methods, seven Aspergillus complexes were identified; Aspergillus fumigatus sensu stricto was the most frequent isolate (86.7%). A 7.5% prevalence of cryptic species was found; A. welwitschiae (A. niger complex-3.1%) and A. lentulus (A. fumigatus complex-2.2%) were the most frequent. Amongst cryptic species, it was found a percentage of resistance to voriconazole, posaconazole and isavuconazole of 47.1, 82.4, and 100%, respectively. Five A. fumigatus sensu stricto showed pan-azole resistance. Sequencing their cyp51A gene revealed the presence of one isolate with TR46/Y121F/T289A mutation and two isolates with TR34/L98H mutation. This study emphasizes the need to identify strains to the species level and to evaluate their antifungal susceptibility in all human originated Aspergillus spp. isolates, particularly those from invasive aspergillosis.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Aspergillus Species and Antifungals Susceptibility in Clinical Setting in the North of Portugal: Cryptic Species and Eme... Eugénia Pinto, Carolina Monteiro, Marta Maia, Miguel A Faria... Published: 23 July 2018
Frontiers in Microbiology,
PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
Aspergillus spp. are agents of a broad-spectrum of diseases among humans. Their growing resistance to azoles, the cornerstone in the management of human aspergillosis, is a worrisome problem around the world. Considering lack of data from Portugal on this topic, particularly from the northern region, a retrospective surveillance study was planned to assess frequency of cryptic Aspergillus species and azoles resistance. A total of 227 clinical isolates, mainly from the respiratory tract (92.1%), collected from three hospitals serving a population of about three million people, were studied for their epidemiology and antifungal susceptibility patterns determined by the E.DEF.9.3 protocol of EUCAST. Employing molecular methods, seven Aspergillus complexes were identified; Aspergillus fumigatus sensu stricto was the most frequent isolate (86.7%). A 7.5% prevalence of cryptic species was found; A. welwitschiae (A. niger complex-3.1%) and A. lentulus (A. fumigatus complex-2.2%) were the most frequent. Amongst cryptic species, it was found a percentage of resistance to voriconazole, posaconazole and isavuconazole of 47.1, 82.4, and 100%, respectively. Five A. fumigatus sensu stricto showed pan-azole resistance. Sequencing their cyp51A gene revealed the presence of one isolate with TR46/Y121F/T289A mutation and two isolates with TR34/L98H mutation. This study emphasizes the need to identify strains to the species level and to evaluate their antifungal susceptibility in all human originated Aspergillus spp. isolates, particularly those from invasive aspergillosis.
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation Antifungal Activity of Thapsia villosa Essential Oil against Candida, Cryptococcus, Malassezia, Aspergillus and Dermatop... Eugénia Pinto, Maria-José Gonçalves, Carlos Cavaleiro, Lígia... Published: 22 September 2017
Molecules, doi: 10.3390/molecules22101595
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The composition of the essential oil (EO) of Thapsia villosa (Apiaceae), isolated by hydrodistillation from the plant's aerial parts, was analysed by GC and GC-MS. Antifungal activity of the EO and its main components, limonene (57.5%) and methyleugenol (35.9%), were evaluated against clinically relevant yeasts (Candida spp., Cryptococcus neoformans and Malassezia furfur) and moulds (Aspergillus spp. and dermatophytes). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were measured according to the broth macrodilution protocols by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The EO, limonene and methyleugenol displayed low MIC and MFC (minimum fungicidal concentration) values against Candida spp., Cryptococcus neoformans, dermatophytes, and Aspergillus spp. Regarding Candida species, an inhibition of yeast-mycelium transition was demonstrated at sub-inhibitory concentrations of the EO (MIC/128; 0.01 μL/mL) and their major compounds in Candida albicans. Fluconazole does not show this activity, and the combination with low concentrations of EO could associate a supplementary target for the antifungal activity. The association of fluconazole with T. villosa oil does not show antagonism, but the combination limonene/fluconazole displays synergism. The fungistatic and fungicidal activities revealed by T. villosa EO and its main compounds, associated with their low haemolytic activity, confirm their potential antimicrobial interest against fungal species often associated with human mycoses.
Article 2 Reads 4 Citations Natural Products: An Alternative to Conventional Therapy for Dermatophytosis? Graciliana Lopes, Eugénia Pinto, Lígia Salgueiro Published: 22 October 2016
Mycopathologia, doi: 10.1007/s11046-016-0081-9
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Conference papers
CONFERENCE-ARTICLE 39 Reads 0 Citations Small molecules from the sea: models for innovative antimicrobial agents Solida Long, Diana Resende, Patrícia Pereira-Terra, Ângela I... Published: 31 October 2018
doi: 10.3390/ecmc-4-05597
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Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most pressing health issues of our days. The marine environment has proven to be a very rich source of diverse natural products with broad-spectra of biologically activities being a very helpful resource in the search for novel antimicrobial compounds. These structurally distinct molecules are revealing promising biological activities against a very large number of drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria and fungi, catching marine natural products attention in the discovery of new antimicrobial agents. Inspired by antimicrobial lichen xanthones [1] and fungi-derived alkaloids, two series of marine natural products mimics were prepared. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity. Both series produced interesting compounds active against E. faecalis (ATCC 29212 and 29213) and S. aureus (ATCC 29213) with some synthetic alkaloids being active against a MRSA strain. Some revealed a potent fungistatic and fungicidal activity against dermatophytes clinical strains (T. rubrum, M. canis, and E. floccosum). These results highlight the potential of marine natural products as a source of new antimicrobial agents to revert resistance.

[1] D. I. S. P. Resende, P. Pereira-Terra, Â. S. Inácio, P. M. Costa, E. Pinto, E. Sousa, M. M. M. Pinto. Lichen Xanthones as Models for New Antifungal Agents. Molecules 2018, 23, 2617; doi:10.3390/molecules23102617

Acknowledgments: This work was partially supported through national funds provided by FCT/MCTES—Foundation for Science and Technology from the Ministry of Science, Technology, and Higher Education (PIDDAC) and the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) through the COMPETE—Programa Operacional Factores de Competitividade (POFC) programme, under the Strategic Funding UID/Multi/04423/2013, the projects POCI-01-0145-FEDER-028736 and POCI-01-0145-FEDER-016790 (PTDC/MAR-BIO/4694/2014; 3599-PPCDT) in the framework of the programme PT2020, as well as by the project INNOVMAR—Innovation and Sustainability in the Management and Exploitation of Marine Resources (reference NORTE-01-0145-FEDER-000035, within Research Line NOVELMAR), supported by North Portugal Regional Operational Programme (NORTE 2020), under the PORTUGAL 2020 Partnership Agreement, through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). Solida Long thanks Erasmus Mundus Action 2 (LOTUS+, LP15DF0205) for full PhD scholarship. Diana I. S. P. Resende also acknowledge for her grant (NOVELMAR/BPD_2/2016-019) and Patrícia Pereira-Terra for her grant (NOVELMAR/BPD/2017/012).

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