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Ângela Inácio   Dr.  Institute, Department or Faculty Head 
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Ângela Inácio published an article in October 2018.
Top co-authors See all
Artur M.S. Silva

518 shared publications

Department of chemistry and QOPNA; University of Aveiro; Campus of Santiago Aveiro Portugal

Madalena Pinto

205 shared publications

Laboratory of Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Department of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal

Anake Kijjoa

106 shared publications

ICBAS-Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar, Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal

Emília Sousa

72 shared publications

Laboratory of Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Rita Mota

65 shared publications

ICBAS-Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar, Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal

4
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18
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4
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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 

Total number of journals
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3
 
Publications
Article 1 Read 0 Citations Lichen Xanthones as Models for New Antifungal Agents Diana I. S. P. Resende, Patrícia Pereira-Terra, Ângela S. In... Published: 12 October 2018
Molecules, doi: 10.3390/molecules23102617
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogenic microorganisms, the search for new antimicrobial compounds plays an important role in current medicinal chemistry research. Inspired by lichen antimicrobial xanthones, a series of novel chlorinated xanthones was prepared using five chlorination methods (Methods A–E) to obtain different patterns of substitution in the xanthone scaffold. All the synthesized compounds were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity. Among them, 3-chloro-4,6-dimethoxy-1-methyl-9H-xanthen-9-one 15 showed promising antibacterial activity against E. faecalis (ATCC 29212 and 29213) and S. aureus ATCC 29213. 2,7-Dichloro-3,4,6-trimethoxy-1-methyl-9H-xanthen-9-one 18 revealed a potent fungistatic and fungicidal activity against dermatophytes clinical strains (T. rubrum, M. canis, and E. floccosum (MIC = 4–8 µg/mL)). Moreover, when evaluated for its synergistic effect for T. rubrum, compound 18 exhibited synergy with fluconazole (ΣFIC = 0.289). These results disclosed new hit xanthones for both antibacterial and antifungal activity.
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation A New Dihydrochromone Dimer and Other Secondary Metabolites from Cultures of the Marine Sponge-Associated Fungi Neosarto... Decha Kumla, Tin Shine Aung, Suradet Buttachon, Tida Dethoup... Published: 01 December 2017
Marine Drugs, doi: 10.3390/md15120375
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A previously unreported dihydrochromone dimer, paecilin E (1), was isolated, together with eleven known compounds: β-sitostenone, ergosta-4,6,8 (14), 22-tetraen-3-one, cyathisterone, byssochlamic acid, dehydromevalonic acid lactone, chevalone B, aszonalenin, dankasterone A (2), helvolic acid, secalonic acid A and fellutanine A, from the culture filtrate extract of the marine sponge-associated fungus Neosartorya fennelliae KUFA 0811. Nine previously reported metabolites, including a chromanol derivative (3), (3β, 5α, 22E), 3,5-dihydroxyergosta-7,22-dien-6-one (4), byssochlamic acid, hopan-3β,22-diol, chevalone C, sartorypyrone B, helvolic acid, lumichrome and the alkaloid harmane were isolated from the culture of the marine-sponge associated fungus Neosartorya tsunodae KUFC 9213. Paecilin E (1), dankasterone A (2), a chromanol derivative (3), (3β, 5α, 22E)-3,5-dihydroxyergosta-7,22-dien-6-one (4), hopan-3β,22-diol (5), lumichrome (6), and harmane (7) were tested for their antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative reference and multidrug-resistant strains isolated from the environment. While paecilin E (1) was active against S. aureus ATCC 29213 and E. faecalis ATCC 29212, dankastetrone A (2) was only effective against E. faecalis ATCC 29212 and the multidrug-resistant VRE E. faecalis A5/102. Both compounds neither inhibit biofilm mass production in any of the strains at the concentrations tested nor exhibit synergistic association with antibiotics.
Article 0 Reads 3 Citations Antibacterial and antibiofilm activities of the metabolites isolated from the culture of the mangrove-derived endophytic... War War May Zin, Suradet Buttachon, Tida Dethoup, José A. Pe... Published: 01 September 2017
Phytochemistry, doi: 10.1016/j.phytochem.2017.05.015
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed
Conference papers
CONFERENCE-ARTICLE 39 Reads 0 Citations Small molecules from the sea: models for innovative antimicrobial agents Solida Long, Diana Resende, Patrícia Pereira-Terra, Ângela I... Published: 31 October 2018
doi: 10.3390/ecmc-4-05597
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract

Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most pressing health issues of our days. The marine environment has proven to be a very rich source of diverse natural products with broad-spectra of biologically activities being a very helpful resource in the search for novel antimicrobial compounds. These structurally distinct molecules are revealing promising biological activities against a very large number of drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria and fungi, catching marine natural products attention in the discovery of new antimicrobial agents. Inspired by antimicrobial lichen xanthones [1] and fungi-derived alkaloids, two series of marine natural products mimics were prepared. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity. Both series produced interesting compounds active against E. faecalis (ATCC 29212 and 29213) and S. aureus (ATCC 29213) with some synthetic alkaloids being active against a MRSA strain. Some revealed a potent fungistatic and fungicidal activity against dermatophytes clinical strains (T. rubrum, M. canis, and E. floccosum). These results highlight the potential of marine natural products as a source of new antimicrobial agents to revert resistance.

[1] D. I. S. P. Resende, P. Pereira-Terra, Â. S. Inácio, P. M. Costa, E. Pinto, E. Sousa, M. M. M. Pinto. Lichen Xanthones as Models for New Antifungal Agents. Molecules 2018, 23, 2617; doi:10.3390/molecules23102617

Acknowledgments: This work was partially supported through national funds provided by FCT/MCTES—Foundation for Science and Technology from the Ministry of Science, Technology, and Higher Education (PIDDAC) and the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) through the COMPETE—Programa Operacional Factores de Competitividade (POFC) programme, under the Strategic Funding UID/Multi/04423/2013, the projects POCI-01-0145-FEDER-028736 and POCI-01-0145-FEDER-016790 (PTDC/MAR-BIO/4694/2014; 3599-PPCDT) in the framework of the programme PT2020, as well as by the project INNOVMAR—Innovation and Sustainability in the Management and Exploitation of Marine Resources (reference NORTE-01-0145-FEDER-000035, within Research Line NOVELMAR), supported by North Portugal Regional Operational Programme (NORTE 2020), under the PORTUGAL 2020 Partnership Agreement, through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). Solida Long thanks Erasmus Mundus Action 2 (LOTUS+, LP15DF0205) for full PhD scholarship. Diana I. S. P. Resende also acknowledge for her grant (NOVELMAR/BPD_2/2016-019) and Patrícia Pereira-Terra for her grant (NOVELMAR/BPD/2017/012).

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