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Paulo Martins Da Costa   Professor  University Educator/Researcher 
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Paulo Martins Da Costa published an article in January 2019.
Top co-authors See all
Artur M. S. Silva

801 shared publications

University of AveiroChemistry Campus Universitário de Santiago 3810-193 Aveiro PORTUGAL

Maria João Rocha

295 shared publications

Department of Ophthalmology, Otorhinolaryngology, and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical School of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil

Madalena M.M. Pinto

257 shared publications

LQOF—Laboratório de Química Orgânica e Farmacêutica, Departamento de Ciências Químicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal

Anake Kijjoa

153 shared publications

CIIMAR - Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research, University of Porto, Terminal de Cruzeiros de Leixões, Avenida General Norton de Matos s/n, 4450-208 Matosinhos, Portugal; ICBAS - Abel Salazar Biomedical Sciences Institute, University of Porto, Rua Jorge de Viterbo Ferreira, 228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal

Luis Gales

78 shared publications

I3S − Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Rua Alfredo Allen, 208, Porto, Portugal

51
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321
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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2006 - 2019)
Total number of journals
published in
 
38
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Erubescensoic Acid, a New Polyketide and a Xanthonopyrone SPF-3059-26 from the Culture of the Marine Sponge-Associated F... Decha Kumla, Tida Dethoup, Luís Gales, José A. Pereira, Joan... Published: 08 January 2019
Molecules, doi: 10.3390/molecules24010208
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A new polyketide erubescensoic acid (1), and the previously reported xanthonopyrone, SPF-3059-26 (2), were isolated from the uninvestigated fractions of the ethyl acetate crude extract of the marine sponge-associated fungus Penicillium erubescens KUFA0220. The structures of the new compound, erubescensoic acid (1), and the previously reported SPF-3059-26 (2), were elucidated by extensive analysis of 1D and 2D-NMR spectra as well as HRMS. The absolute configuration of the stereogenic carbon of erubescensoic acid (1) was determined by X-ray analysis. Erubescensoic acid (1) and SPF-3059-26 (2), together with erubescenschromone B (3), penialidin D (4), and 7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-4-oxo-3-[(1E)-3-oxobut-1-en-1-yl]-4H-chromen-5-carboxylic acid (5), recently isolated from this fungus, were assayed for their antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative reference strains and the multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains from the environment. The capacity of these compounds to interfere with the bacterial biofilm formation and their potential synergism with clinically relevant antibiotics for the MDR strains were also investigated.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Occurrence of mcr-1 in Escherichia coli from rabbits of intensive farming Joana Freitas-Silva, Ângela S. Inácio, Joana Mourão, Patríci... Published: 01 December 2018
Veterinary Microbiology, doi: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2018.10.020
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Article 3 Reads 2 Citations Lichen Xanthones as Models for New Antifungal Agents Diana I. S. P. Resende, Patrícia Pereira-Terra, Ângela S. In... Published: 12 October 2018
Molecules, doi: 10.3390/molecules23102617
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Due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogenic microorganisms, the search for new antimicrobial compounds plays an important role in current medicinal chemistry research. Inspired by lichen antimicrobial xanthones, a series of novel chlorinated xanthones was prepared using five chlorination methods (Methods A–E) to obtain different patterns of substitution in the xanthone scaffold. All the synthesized compounds were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity. Among them, 3-chloro-4,6-dimethoxy-1-methyl-9H-xanthen-9-one 15 showed promising antibacterial activity against E. faecalis (ATCC 29212 and 29213) and S. aureus ATCC 29213. 2,7-Dichloro-3,4,6-trimethoxy-1-methyl-9H-xanthen-9-one 18 revealed a potent fungistatic and fungicidal activity against dermatophytes clinical strains (T. rubrum, M. canis, and E. floccosum (MIC = 4–8 µg/mL)). Moreover, when evaluated for its synergistic effect for T. rubrum, compound 18 exhibited synergy with fluconazole (ΣFIC = 0.289). These results disclosed new hit xanthones for both antibacterial and antifungal activity.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations River water analysis using a multiparametric approach: Portuguese river as a case study Ana Barbosa-Vasconcelos, Ângelo Mendes, Flávia Martins, Elis... Published: 24 September 2018
Journal of Water and Health, doi: 10.2166/wh.2018.047
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Article 0 Reads 1 Citation Chromone Derivatives and Other Constituents from Cultures of the Marine Sponge-Associated Fungus Penicillium erubescens ... Decha Kumla, José A. Pereira, Tida Dethoup, Luis Gales, Joan... Published: 20 August 2018
Marine Drugs, doi: 10.3390/md16080289
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A previously unreported chromene derivative, 1-hydroxy-12-methoxycitromycin (1c), and four previously undescribed chromone derivatives, including pyanochromone (3b), spirofuranochromone (4), 7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-4-oxo-3-[(1E)-3-oxobut-1-en-1-yl]-4H-chromene-5-carboxylic acid (5), a pyranochromone dimer (6) were isolated, together with thirteen known compounds: β-sitostenone, ergosterol 5,8-endoperoxide, citromycin (1a), 12-methoxycitromycin (1b), myxotrichin D (1d), 12-methoxycitromycetin (1e), anhydrofulvic acid (2a), myxotrichin C (2b), penialidin D (2c), penialidin F (3a), SPF-3059-30 (7), GKK1032B (8) and secalonic acid A (9), from cultures of the marine sponge- associated fungus Penicillium erubescens KUFA0220. Compounds 1a–e, 2a, 3a, 4, 7–9, were tested for their antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative reference and multidrug-resistant strains isolated from the environment. Only 8 exhibited an in vitro growth inhibition of all Gram-positive bacteria whereas 9 showed growth inhibition of methicillin-resistant Staphyllococus aureus (MRSA). None of the compounds were active against Gram-negative bacteria tested.
Article 0 Reads 6 Citations Bis-Indolyl Benzenoids, Hydroxypyrrolidine Derivatives and Other Constituents from Cultures of the Marine Sponge-Associa... Suradet Buttachon, Alice A. Ramos, Ângela Inácio, Tida Detho... Published: 06 April 2018
Marine Drugs, doi: 10.3390/md16040119
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A previously unreported bis-indolyl benzenoid, candidusin D (2e) and a new hydroxypyrrolidine alkaloid, preussin C (5b) were isolated together with fourteen previously described compounds: palmitic acid, clionasterol, ergosterol 5,8-endoperoxides, chrysophanic acid (1a), emodin (1b), six bis-indolyl benzenoids including asterriquinol D dimethyl ether (2a), petromurin C (2b), kumbicin B (2c), kumbicin A (2d), 2″-oxoasterriquinol D methyl ether (3), kumbicin D (4), the hydroxypyrrolidine alkaloid preussin (5a), (3S, 6S)-3,6-dibenzylpiperazine-2,5-dione (6) and 4-(acetylamino) benzoic acid (7), from the cultures of the marine sponge-associated fungus Aspergillus candidus KUFA 0062. Compounds 1a, 2a–e, 3, 4, 5a–b, and 6 were tested for their antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative reference and multidrug-resistant strains isolated from the environment. Only 5a exhibited an inhibitory effect against S. aureus ATCC 29213 and E. faecalis ATCC29212 as well as both methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) strains. Both 1a and 5a also reduced significant biofilm formation in E. coli ATCC 25922. Moreover, 2b and 5a revealed a synergistic effect with oxacillin against MRSA S. aureus 66/1 while 5a exhibited a strong synergistic effect with the antibiotic colistin against E. coli 1410/1. Compound 1a, 2a–e, 3, 4, 5a–b, and 6 were also tested, together with the crude extract, for cytotoxic effect against eight cancer cell lines: HepG2, HT29, HCT116, A549, A 375, MCF-7, U-251, and T98G. Except for 1a, 2a, 2d, 4, and 6, all the compounds showed cytotoxicity against all the cancer cell lines tested.
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