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Lisa A. Tell  - - - 
Top co-authors See all
Ravinder N. M. Sehgal

54 shared publications

Department of Biology, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, USA

Christopher J. Murphy

51 shared publications

Ocular Services On Demand (OSOD), LLC, Madison, USA

Anthony J. Cornel

47 shared publications

Vector Genetics Laboratory, Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology; UC Davis; Davis California

Christopher M Barker

36 shared publications

Davis Arbovirus Research and Training and Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA

Federico Giannitti

12 shared publications

Instituto Nacional de Investigación Agropecuaria (INIA), Plataforma de Investigación en Salud Animal, La Estanzuela, Colonia, Uruguay

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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2003 - 2018)
Total number of journals
published in
 
11
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation Use of RFID technology to characterize feeder visitations and contact network of hummingbirds in urban habitats Ruta R. Bandivadekar, Pranav S. Pandit, Rahel Sollmann, Mich... Published: 12 December 2018
PLOS ONE, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0208057
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Despite the popular use of hummingbird feeders, there are limited studies evaluating the effects of congregation, sharing food resources and increased contact when hummingbirds visit feeders in urban landscapes. To evaluate behavioral interactions occurring at feeders, we tagged 230 individuals of two species, Anna’s and Allen’s Hummingbirds, with passive integrated transponder tags and recorded their visits with RFID transceivers at feeders. For detecting the presence of tagged birds, we developed an RFID equipped feeding station using a commercially available antenna and RFID transceiver. Data recorded included the number of feeder visits, time spent at the feeder, simultaneous feeder visitation by different individuals, and identifying which feeders were most commonly visited by tagged birds. For the study period (September 2016 to March 2018), 118,017 detections were recorded at seven feeding stations located at three California sites. The rate of tagged birds returning to RFID equipped feeders at least once was 61.3% (141/230 birds). Females stayed at feeders longer than males per visit. We identified primary, secondary and tertiary feeders at Sites 2 and 3, according to the frequency of visitation to them, with a mean percentage of 86.9% (SD±19.13) visits to a primary feeder for each tagged hummingbird. During spring and summer, hummingbirds visited feeders most often in morning and evening hours. Feeder visits by males overlapped in time with other males more frequently than other females. The analysis of the contact network at the feeders did not distinguish any significant differences between age or sex. Although most hummingbirds visited the feeders during the daytime, our system recorded night feeder visitations (n = 7 hummingbirds) at one site. This efficient use of RFID technology to characterize feeder visitations and contact networks of hummingbirds in urban habitats could be used in the future to elucidate behaviors, population dynamics and community structure of hummingbirds visiting feeders.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Use of RFID technology to characterize feeder visitations and contact network of hummingbirds in urban habitats. Ruta R. Bandivadekar, Pranav S. Pandit, Rahel Sollmann, Mich... Published: 12 December 2018
PLOS ONE,
PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
Despite the popular use of hummingbird feeders, there are limited studies evaluating the effects of congregation, sharing food resources and increased contact when hummingbirds visit feeders in urban landscapes. To evaluate behavioral interactions occurring at feeders, we tagged 230 individuals of two species, Anna's and Allen's Hummingbirds, with passive integrated transponder tags and recorded their visits with RFID transceivers at feeders. For detecting the presence of tagged birds, we developed an RFID equipped feeding station using a commercially available antenna and RFID transceiver. Data recorded included the number of feeder visits, time spent at the feeder, simultaneous feeder visitation by different individuals, and identifying which feeders were most commonly visited by tagged birds. For the study period (September 2016 to March 2018), 118,017 detections were recorded at seven feeding stations located at three California sites. The rate of tagged birds returning to RFID equipped feeders at least once was 61.3% (141/230 birds). Females stayed at feeders longer than males per visit. We identified primary, secondary and tertiary feeders at Sites 2 and 3, according to the frequency of visitation to them, with a mean percentage of 86.9% (SD±19.13) visits to a primary feeder for each tagged hummingbird. During spring and summer, hummingbirds visited feeders most often in morning and evening hours. Feeder visits by males overlapped in time with other males more frequently than other females. The analysis of the contact network at the feeders did not distinguish any significant differences between age or sex. Although most hummingbirds visited the feeders during the daytime, our system recorded night feeder visitations (n = 7 hummingbirds) at one site. This efficient use of RFID technology to characterize feeder visitations and contact networks of hummingbirds in urban habitats could be used in the future to elucidate behaviors, population dynamics and community structure of hummingbirds visiting feeders.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations HISTOPATHOLOGIC FINDINGS IN FREE-RANGING CALIFORNIA HUMMINGBIRDS, 1996–2017 Michelle Magagna, Erica Noland, Lisa A. Tell, Guthrum Purdin... Published: 26 November 2018
Journal of Wildlife Diseases, doi: 10.7589/2018-05-130
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Extralabel drug use in small ruminants Krysta L. Martin, Maaike O. Clapham, Jennifer L. Davis, Rona... Published: 15 October 2018
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, doi: 10.2460/javma.253.8.1001
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Application of different pharmacokinetic models to describe and predict pharmacokinetics of voriconazole in magellanic p... Ruth A. Parsley, Adrian G. Mutlow, Jacqueline Hansted, Femke... Published: 02 September 2018
Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, doi: 10.1111/jvp.12709
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Aspergillosis is a condition causing serious morbidity and mortality in captive penguins and other bird species. It can be treated with antifungal drugs, such as voriconazole. However, the pharmacokinetics of voriconazole are variable between different animal and bird species. Therefore, the pharmacokinetics of voriconazole were investigated in this study in Magellanic penguins. Pharmacokinetic models were constructed and applied to predict the pharmacokinetics of voriconazole during long‐term treatment in Magellanic penguins, since the voriconazole treatment duration in chronic aspergillosis cases can last up to several months. Plasma voriconazole concentration–time data from adult Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus; n = 15) following a single oral (PO) dose of either 2.5 mg/kg or 5 mg/kg in a herring in three separate study periods 7–12 months apart were collected. Mean plasma voriconazole concentrations were above the targeted MIC for Aspergillus fumigatus for 2 hr following a single 2.5 mg/kg voriconazole dose while the plasma concentrations exceeded the MIC for least 24 hr following a 5 mg/kg dose. Nonlinear mixed‐effects modeling was used to fit two pharmacokinetic models, one with first‐order and another with saturable elimination, to the single‐dose data. Fits were good for both, as long as dose was included as a covariate for the first‐order model so that clearance was lower and the half‐life longer for animals receiving the 5 mg/kg dose. Although the single‐dose data suggested saturated elimination at higher concentrations, the model with saturable elimination did not predict plasma voriconazole concentrations well for a clinical aspergillosis case receiving long‐term treatment, possibly because of induction of metabolizing enzymes with chronic exposure. Pharmacokinetic models should accurately predict plasma drug concentrations for different dosage regimens in order to be applicable in the field. Future studies should focus on determining clearance at steady‐state to be able to refine the pharmacokinetic models presented here and improve model performance for long‐term oral voriconazole administration in Magellanic penguins.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Drug residues in poultry meat: A literature review of commonly used veterinary antibacterials and anthelmintics used in ... Trishna Patel, Tara Marmulak, Ronette Gehring, Maurice Pites... Published: 03 August 2018
Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, doi: 10.1111/jvp.12700
DOI See at publisher website
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